This past Sunday, my pastor Chad Pullins, quoted a friend of his who recently celebrated his father’s life and legacy after his passing; “My father didn’t just leave me with memories; he left me with a legacy as well.”

My life’s work allows me to speak with fathers and sons form every walk of life and cross-section of cultures. Here’s one of the top three or four statements fatherless fathers and fatherless sons make during my exchange with them. “I wished that we had made more good memories together.” Memories, both good and bad, linger in hearts and minds most of the time, for the rest of our lives. They are markers of events that generally made a significant impact on us all. Memories are a must, good ones, that help us remember life, love, goodness, and satisfaction in knowing we were loved.

Not slamming memories because they are the recorded historical artifacts of the life experiences of the ones we hold dear and love most. Good memories fill large portions of our hearts and souls. Memories are only one side of the coin though. The other side of the coin is legacy.

Legacy is something endowed or conveyed to another. Focusing on the future of our children and how they will live out their lives, what do we build into to them at early ages? What are the core values they will choose to live by, the type of character they will exhibit, where and how will they learn to nurture their spiritual lives? How will they carry on the family name? What did we impart to them through teaching, training building a healthy son or daughter replicating the “legacy” we transferred to them? All the above is by default or by intent.

Keeping an eye on your horizon, understanding who you are, what you’re design is, what you’re destined for, the one thing you’re wired to do in life. Where you go, you lead your family. Where are you leading your wife and children? Your leadership bears significantly upon their future and destiny. Most importantly, you are an ancestor in the line of your descendants and the influence you bring to bear on them by your life. What path are you leaving for them to follow?

Fathers have so many responsibilities that rest upon their shoulders that many times we can get distracted and detoured in leading well. There are three words that I am building into principle in living out my day today. Simple, minimal, pure.

Leading Family With Clarity

  1. Simple. Innocent, modest, and free from complication. Reducing the ability and opportunity for distraction, disruption, and detour to ditch the pathway we are pioneering for our family to follow. Marking a pioneered path to the horizon of your life helps your family navigate their lives well.
  2. Minimal. “of a minimum amount, quantity, or degree; negligible.” Being minimal is the reduction of additional opportunities for non-essential decisions that will derail or ditch the ones that you lead. It’s the process of reducing the infractions of core values, deviation from character traits exhibited and taught, and the nurturing of spiritual life.
  3. Pure. “not mixed or adulterated with any other substance or material.” It is the insurance of not mixing with the base family concepts and traditions, the opinions of people, culture, or popular belief of the community with the heart of what you and your wife have established for your family’s heritage.

For more about Chad: chadpullins.com

#Purpose #Identity #Sonship

#clearvision #impart #transfer

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